This weekend I will not be relaxing all cool, shooting some b-ball outside of a school because I graduated and I don’t play basketball.

What I am going to be doing is driving to Colorado to help a friend out. You see, I hate moving people. I did it a lot when I was younger but as my body has been ravaged by the sand blastings of time the idea to perform manual labor for a payment of pizza doesn’t have the same exchange rate as it once did. The only exceptions to this rule are:

A. Family that I like

B. Friends who haven’t utilized this service and that I like

C. The Hulk, as he packs light

Jon is a friend of mine who is in a tough spot, having moved to Colorado to live with his girlfriend the relationship did not end well, and now his stuff must be moved back to the dry wasteland that is California.

Seriously, everyone, stop moving here. I want a house.

What does this particular scenario have to do with a writer’s brain? When a writer goes anywhere they have a narrative spinning in their mind, or at least I do, and begin to see multiple storylines as actual possibilities. The elements that shape these storylines are:

A. Who is at the location?

B. What is their mental state?

C. What is the possibility of things happening?

This particular trip has a few elements in play, lots of moving parts, but here are the possible scenarios that could occur:

A. Jon and I go to Colorado, we get the stuff, and come home.

B. Jon and I go to Colorado, we are ambushed at the ex’s house and are forced to watch Frozen, and only the scene with Let It Go, till we crack and tell her where the Nazi gold is buried in Poland.

C. Jon and I go to Colorado, we get murdered, no one ever hears from us again (If this happens, know the butler did it).

D. Jon and I do not get to Colorado, but are instead forced to join a dangerous airboat gang that haunts the swamps of Louisiana.

E. Jon and I find The Neverending Story book from the movie, read it, and kill ourselves after re-living the horse swamp scene.

Of course, some of these are fantastical, but none-the-less are possible. I thank you for joining me through these hyper realistic scenarios and wish you a good day.

Written by Maz

Nick enjoys making things and drinking coffee, specifically the latter, for without it the former wouldn’t get done. He also wrote a book titled "Where Monsters Lie & Other Tales"